• punk
  • southern-rock

Ma 12-02 | Patronaat | Open 19.30 u Aanvang 20.00 u

Youth Detention Tour

Lee Bains III & the Glory Fires (USA)

Lee Bains III & the Glory Fires (USA)

Southern-punkers Lee Baines III & the Glory Fires brengen eind dit jaar hun album Youth Detention///(Nail My Feet Down to the South Side of Town) (zeg maar: Youth Detention) uit. Direct daarna start de bijbehorende tour, die maandag 12 februari Patronaat aan doet. met maar liefst 17 songs is dit het meest ambitieuze project tot nu toe van de band. met zoals gewoonlijk heel veel stevige punk, op een gespreid bedje van o.a. soul, power pop, country en zelfs gospel: southern-punk dus. met een heerlijke echo naar bands als The Kinks, The Jam, Blur en R.E.M - om maar een klein tijdreisje te maken.

On Dec 8th, Don Giovanni Records will release Youth Detention///(Nail My Feet Down to the South Side of Town), the third full-length album by Lee Bains III & the Glory Fires. Call it Youth Detention for short.
A double LP spanning 17 songs, it is the band’s most ambitious work to date -- a sprawling and visceral record given to both deep introspection and high-volume spiritual uplift. The Glory Fires’ music draws deeply from punk, but also soul, power pop, country, and gospel.  The four piece from Birmingham, Alabama include Lee, Eric Wallace and brothers Adam & Blake Williamson. They have toured Europe twice previous and will be playing their first European tour this next Jan and February. Monday, February 12th in Patronaat Haarlem!

UNCUT magazine recently compared them to the best of Drive By Truckers Southern epic songs and says “Bains admits the influences of Britsh bands like The Kinks, Jam and Blur but also 80s college rockers such as The Primitons, Let’s Active and REM” 

Recorded in Nashville, Tennessee at Battletapes with engineer Jeremy Ferguson and producer Tim Kerr, Youth Detention captures the band in raw form. Each song was cut live to tape, with the four performing in the same room without headphones or baffling. The result is thoroughly human, Lynn Bridges' mix retaining the band's live energy and looseness at the expense of a few out of tune strings. It’s equal parts careful curation and geographic inheritance. “It’s the sound of my place,” says Bains. “I want to know it. I want to argue with it. I don’t want to be a band from anywhere that could be doing anything. For me, that’s what punk is about -- figuring out who I am and how to be the best version of myself. I can’t do that by pretending to be something I’m not.”
The songs are deeply rooted in Bains’ experience of his hometown, Birmingham, AL. Youth Detention depicts a Southern city in the decades surrounding the turn-of-the-millennium: in the throes of white flight, urban disinvestment, racial tension, class struggle, gentrification, gender policing, homophobia, xenophobia, religious fervor, deindustrialization, and economic upheaval.